Tag Archives: security

New Mac malware from Russia targets your saved passwords and iPhone backups

It used to be that Mac computers were immune from the vast majority of viruses and malware plaguing Windows and other platforms. But as Apple’s products have been growing in popularity, hackers and malware developers have been increasingly targeting macOS. Following recent reports of Mac malware that uses a very old Windows trick which relies on Microsoft Word macros, […]

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Malwarebytes reports first case of Mac malware for 2017, points out antiquated tactics

Security software development firm Malwarebytes has just exposed what could be the first known case of Mac malware for the year of 2017. It appears to be a highly antiquated piece of malware. In other words, it’s not super advanced and it’s using methods to infect machines that are so well-known that only a small […]

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VPN. Here’s how I do it anyway.

There’s no end of VPN solutions on t’interweb. Likewise, if you have a look on iTunes or Google Play there’s a big list of VPN apps for you. However, with the increasing popularity of Kodi TV boxes and the streams and programmes they deliver, it’s worth getting protected.

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

A lot of the techies out there will know what a VPN is, but for the rest it’s basically a way to add security and privacy to your internet. You might have other reasons for wanting a VPN..

  • To some extent it’ll hide you when you’re streaming movies and TV via a Kodi box.
  • With a lot of VPN providers you can choose the endpoint to circumvent geo-restrictions.
  • You may be able to avoid traffic shaping implemented by your ISP.

Basically, when you buy an internet connection at home, you’re going to have a router. That router will dish out IP addresses to each internet-connected thing in your house. An IP address is basically a stack of numbers so that your thing can be identified. Your phone will have one, your tablet will have one, your Chromecast, your Nest thermostat and so on.

Here’s my EE Brightbox router. It’s a standard FTTC (Fibre To The Cabinet) router which pumps out WiFi and connects up to a few of my internal bits via ethernet. There’s nothing special about it and I’m not going to meddle with it at all in this example.

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

When all of your gadgets need to get out to the internet, they’ll hit that router (above) that your ISP usually gives you for free. This router has an external IP address, and that means that all of your traffic can be seen and tracked.

With a VPN connection this external IP address is replaced with one from the VPN provider. That external IP could be anywhere – in America, in Germany or wherever else in the world the VPN provider has an endpoint. You can configure all this later.

So, in my setup I have a standard FTTC (fibre) connection. It’s connected to the internet and pumps out a WiFi connection. All my devices connect to it, but I wanted another WiFi connection which was connected over VPN.

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

Many years ago, when we moved into our house, I decided to stick the main router in the garage. This is because the main BT socket (above) is in the hall and the garage is behind. Back in 1975, when our house was built, many people had the main BT box in the hall because that’s where a corded phone sat – usually on a little phone table. Now, in 2017, I really don’t want a table or a load of kit balanced on it, so a cable goes through a hole in the wall and into the garage. From the router I have one ethernet connection running along the outside of the house and into the hole in the lounge where the TV cables from the satellite dish go. This originally was for our non-WiFi Sky box to talk to the outside world.

It all ends up around the back of our TV. In all honesty it’s a bit of a disaster back there. Cables everywhere, but I want to put a WiFi router in here which connects via VPN.

Before I go on, here is a video overview showing you the setup..

VPN Router Choice

I’m not a fan on spending unnecessary amounts of money, so I went onto eBay and looked around for a router with the DD-WRT custom firmware on. This firmware is a Linux based alternative and it can be installed on all of these routers. It’s really easy to use and supported by a lot of VPN providers too, which is a bonus.

My main FTTC router isn’t on that list. It won’t do VPN at the moment and I didn’t really want to mess around with the config on that, so I bought a Netgear WNR834b V2 to act as the VPN router. Here it is below…
VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

You can have a search of eBay and find something similar. It was a bit scratched but only cost £18. That’ll do me. It’s only going to sit under my TV so it doesn’t have to look pretty.

VPN Provider Choice

There’s always deals available. I chose PureVPN because it was cheap and I knew it that they had a great support section for DD-WRT routers. I pay $2.45 per month, but as I type you can get two years for the price of one – that’s $29.40 for a year (or two if you get this deal).

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

I’ve not been disappointed with the speed and it’s a simple setup.

You can also try providers like NordVPN, who also have an offer on…

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

As a rule of thumb, try and get a provider with some good support pages. One that has endpoints in different countries and has a good infrastructure so that you don’t have any buffering or anything like that.

Setting up

On my cheap eBay Netgear router,  I set the WAN connection type. Where you’d normally see an Fibre connection, or an ADSL connection or whatever – here instead you connect via PPTP or (should you wish) L2TP. The “WAN” part is actually my main LAN. Confusing I know, but I don’t want everything in my house VPN’d, just some devices.  So this router has an internal IP range (which is 192.168.1.XX incidentally) and my “normal” network has a 10.60.3.XX range. To the VPN router, the 10.60.3.XX range is the “WAN”, it’s how it’ll connect to the world.

The blue cable plugged into the “Internet” port on my Netgear VPN router goes to my normal EE router, and the blue cable (I should’ve chosen different colours!) goes to the Android TV box which I want connected over VPN.

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

Below you can see part of my PureVPN details – I’ve told it here to connect to the fastest US endpoint. You can have it connect to a European endpoint, a UK one or whatever. Switch it around by changing this part. If, for example, you don’t live in the UK but want to watch UK TV and get sites as if you were in the UK, you’d perhaps put the UK endpoint here.

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

Last of all, I’ve set a WiFi AP (Access Point) and given it a name to highlight the fact that it’s my VPN connection..

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

So now, when I’m at home in the UK, I just connect to my normal WiFi access point from my EE router. If I want it to look like I’m in the USA, I connect to the internetz-vpn access point.

As an example, in the UK on my normal WiFi connection, if I try to go to cnn.com, I get the International site…

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

I’m also unable to watch the live CNN stream, and instead get fed some short video clips to choose from..

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

However, on the VPN I get the full US editon of the website..

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

I also get that “Live TV” button and I can watch the US TV feed..

VPN. Heres how I do it anyway.

That is about it. I know there’s lots of alternatives and yes, I know that you can setup a VPN on your phone or download an app to do it, but I like to setup once and then ignore it so I can just use and re-use later.

 

The post VPN. Here’s how I do it anyway. is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • Here’s everything Cellebrite’s forensic tool can extract from iPhones

    Documents uncovered by ZDNet have revealed the true scope of technology from Israeli developer Cellebrite Mobile Synchronization, which specializes in smartphone data extraction, transfer and analysis. The leaked documents show just how much private data its smartphone forensic tool UFED, used by law enforcement, is capable of extracting from iPhones. In a single data-extraction session,...

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    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera – Review

    Having a security camera on your house can be a good and bad thing. Sure, you can keep an eye on things, but it’s also a sign that you want to keep something protected, and thieves might target your house because it’s got cameras hanging off it.

    So how do you monitor your home without anyone really knowing?

    Well, here we’ve got something pretty different, and it’s been sent to us all the way from America by the inventor himself. It’s available from Amazon.com for $279.

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    The creator is honest about what the camera doesn’t currently have. On his Invent Plus website he details the two minor drawbacks. Firstly, the camera doesn’t have infrared (IR) night vision. In my testing it appears to “see” about the same as your eyes would, so if you point this at a street or road bathed in lights, you’ll be fine. Likewise if you have it in your garden and have a motion-activated light then you’ll have no problems too. Also, in the box, you’ll find a 128GB SD card. It’s that large because the second minor point is that there’s no WiFi access, so you can’t control it from your phone or anything like that.

    However, there’s quite a bit to this, so let’s take a look.

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    Here in the UK you’ll need to decide for yourself as to whether this will look good in your garden at the end of your driveway. It emits a purple light and stands on a ground stake which is about a foot tall alone. It measures 6″ x 6″ x 9.5″. In new money that’s 15.24cm x 15.24cm x 15.24cm. With the stake it’s 28″, which is 71.12cm.

    Build quality? It’s very good. It’s made from plastic and plexiglass, so there’s no chance of glass breakage and the top in particular is solid and strong. Definitely a quality product, and you can already tell when the box arrives – it’s a decent and reassuring weight.

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    The camera itself is noticeable, but I am – of course – looking for the thing. Passing people would just assume that this is a nice piece of garden furniture and yes, this is a classy looking thing which looks almost wooden. That camera has an auto low-light mode with optical zooming and a 16 megapixel resolution. It’s a Canon Powershot camera and the pictures it took during this review were very good.

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    The light itself is courtesy of 12 LEDs which pull 2.5w with 300 LM total brightness. With the camera it pulls 5w (500mA). The whole lantern is easy to setup and build. Underneath the top part you’ll find the power inlet and an SD card slot.

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    Wait a minute though. How do you get power all the way out to this?

    Well, there’s a 100 foot cable included in the box for supplying the power. It’s nicely rolled up and is two-gauge lightweight cabling which can be tucked under cable clips or around shrubbery and below ground. It’s long enough to not only put it at the end of your drive, but at the end of next doors’ drive too. This, I guess, is designed more for American homes where driveways are much longer, so here in the UK you’ve got plenty, believe me.

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    To give you an idea on how all this works together, I placed it in the garden. I did this because there’s been a few reports of burglaries recently and the people involved have been hopping over rear fences, so I put it in the garden and threaded the power cable into the stake.

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    That’s simple enough and it screws into the base of the lantern. You then unroll the long length of power cable and get it back to your nearest power socket. Getting it through your wall is easy also because, at the other end of the cable, you can unscrew the cable from the plug. This leaves just two threads of cable to thread through a hole. Then it’s just a matter of re-screwing and plugging it into the supplied adaptor.

    The lantern can be used in a number of different ways. Out of the box it’ll take still images when motion is detected. You can change this easily by editing a file found on the SD card. The instructions will tell you how to do this, but it’s relatively simple. Here’s a snippet of the file, which is plain text and sits in the root of the SD card …

    * function_mode = 0
    * function_mode = 1
    * function_mode = 2

    These modes are to switch between motion detection mode (0), timelapse mode (1) and scheduled shooting mode (2). It basically means that you can have it snap pictures or record looped video constantly between certain times. Ideal if you want to record absolutely everything and then you can watch it back.

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    * md_threshold = n

    This sets to motion detection sensitivity. The higher the number is, the more sensitive it is.

    There’s a stack more settings which are a little more advanced, such as setting just how bright “dusk” is and whether to immediately snap a shot or whether to snap a shot a number of seconds after motion is detected. You could perhaps adjust this if you live on a long road and want to detect oncoming cars but only take a shot when they get a bit nearer. You can also dictate how long to take between shots.

    The scheduled times can be set and daylight saving can be set too.

    The operating modes are ..

    * shoot() – Which takes a normal photo.
    * video(n) – Takes a video lasting “n” seconds.
    * continuous_shoot(n) – Takes a series of pictures in burst mode.
    * zoom(n) – Changes zoom camera setting.

    The result, and I used default settings out of the box, is lots of photos on the card. You can switch to video if you wish, and then it’ll record video and will auto-overwrite when the card becomes full.

    Worried about someone damaging your car? Want to know who’s going past your house at night? Want to check the registration plate of that suspicious-looking car that has driven past your house? This’ll do it.

    Here’s a selection of images that the camera retrieved based on movement, but you can add the operating modes together, so out of the box if movement was detected it would take a photo, then zoom in by “5” and take another, then take another wide shot, then another zoomed shot. You can perhaps do a zoom incrementally to take a closer image each time.

    First, say hello to our cat. She’ll feature quite a bit on this..

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    Here’s a shot which was zoomed. There’s a bird on top of the fence and this image was taken into direct sunlight..

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    Here you can see how the camera has zoomed in, then taken a wide shot, then zoomed in again. It’s a beautiful shot of my backside, I must admit. Sorry about that. I wasn’t really thinking and found this after :)

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    Here’s the cat again. She seemed to take a big interest in the camera.

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    Yes, you get a shot of my bum and you can see the cat but there’s a serious side to all this. With the zoom function you can see registration plates and a lot more besides. You can also use it to see if a neighbours cat is coming into your garden or to maybe keep an eye on neighbours and delivery men without them knowing. The LED lights on the camera let out a nicely balanced – if somewhat purple – light.

    Here, from the makers site, is a look at the zoom capabilities of the camera…

    Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera   Review

    The main advantage of this camera compared to others is the fact that this is a real 16 megapixel optical lens resolution. You can, if you want to upgrade a little, use an Eye-Fi card to get connectivity to the lantern via an SD card with WiFi capabilities.

    Overall it’s a well made gadget for the security conscious and those who’d just like to see what’s happening around their home while they’re not looking. There’s sadly no light sensor, so those LED lights are on all the time whether you want them to be or not. It’s also up to you as to whether this will be in keeping with your local surroundings, and it is quite pricey at $279. Sure, as we mentioned before there’s no IR for making this work in complete darkness, but you have to consider that a stack of very noticeable IR lights would be needed to give that functionality.

    However, if you do want to keep an eye on your pets, spot some local wildlife or keep an eye on your car or house while you’re out – it’s definitely worth checking out as it won’t let the world know that you’re keeping an eye on your home.

    Above all, the running theme I got from using this was that someone had taken a great deal of care to create it. The manual was spot on and in the box you get connector jacks, a screwdriver – even a microfibre cloth for keeping the glass clean too. It felt like a labour of love.

    I’ll be uploading some video when I have it, so do check back here shortly :)

    The post Spy Lantern Surveillance Camera – Review is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • How to use the on-demand VPN feature on your iPhone or iPad

    Depending on the VPN you’re using, your iPhone or iPad might be able to take advantage of a feature called VPN on demand (VPoD). Essentially what this does is it connects you to your VPN automatically when it’s needed so you don’t have to toggle it on manually before accessing the internet from your device. […]

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    macOS Sierra 10.12.2 fixed vulnerability that let attackers obtain disk encryption password

    Last week’s macOS Sierra 10.12.2 software update squashed a number of bugs and patched a few newly discovered  vulnerabilities, among them one that allowed an attacker to obtain your FileVault disk encryption password by plugging in a $300 Thunderbolt device into a locked or sleeping Mac. As detailed by security researcher Ulf Frisk, attackers must have […]

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    Capture and clone contactless cards easily. Dodgy as.

    Capture and clone contactless cards easily. Dodgy as.

    I saw this particular item appear on a promoted tweet this morning and had to check I wasn’t going mad. For just over £126, it’ll capture your tap-to-pay card information and will then clone it. The result, after just a few minutes carrying the thing on the tube, a bus or train, is a huge stack of card details that you can then use and abuse.

    The description of the product is frighteningly honest …

    The ChameleonMini firmware can be configured and uploaded via USB to emulate a passive NFC device (e.g. a contactless card), act as an active NFC device (e.g. an RFID reader), sniff the communication (i.e. monitor the bits on the RF interface), and log the communication (during emulation and sniffing).

    So, let’s just go over that again. It can pretend to be a reader, so can grab your card details when you’re close to it. It can then emulate your card so that the device can be held next to a payment machine to pay for items. Even if that’s not possible, this machine should be able to read your card number and sort code, plus it can copy door entry cards too, potentially letting people get into your workplace.

    Capture and clone contactless cards easily. Dodgy as.

    Of course, the makers of this device, which is based on open source software, tell us that it’s purely for “practical NFC and RFID security analysis, compliance and penetration tests, and various end-user applications” but then they also say that..

    The freely programmable platform can create perfect clones of various existing commercial smartcards, including cryptographic functions and the Unique Identifier (UID).

    Scary times. What next? Wrap your card in foil?

    Capture and clone contactless cards easily. Dodgy as.

    The post Capture and clone contactless cards easily. Dodgy as. is original content from Coolsmartphone. If you see it on another news website, please let us know.

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  • Hacker Luca Todesco advises jailbreakers to avoid updating to iOS 10.2

    While there’s still no public jailbreak for iOS 10 to date, there have been some very convincing demos of personal jailbreaks for it, most of which have come out of the woodwork from none other than well-known iOS hacker Luca Todesco. Amid the current jailbreak situation, Todesco is now seen warning netizens that if they have […]

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