AT&T’s first self-branded tablet is built for the budget crowd

AT&T Trek HD tablet

Hey, Verizon: you're not the only US carrier that can play the in-house tablet game. AT&T has unveiled the Trek HD, the network's first self-branded slate. The 8-inch Android design isn't exactly flagship-class, but it might hit the spot if you want LTE data on the cheap. You're getting a modest 1.6GHz quad-core Snapdragon 400 processor, 5-megapixel rear and 2-megapixel front cameras, 16GB of expandable storage and an 8-hour battery. It does ship with Lollipop out of the box, though, and the price is certainly right -- you're looking at $50 on contract, or $200 over a 20-month installment plan. If all you want is a way to check Facebook when you're on vacation, you'll probably be fine.

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Source: AT&T

AT&T pulling back on throttling of unlimited LTE customers

AT&T Chicago store (interior 001)

AT&T is pulling back on its throttling efforts against unlimited LTE customers, reports ArsTechnica. The site noticed that the carrier recently changed its policy to say that it will only throttle users with unlimited LTE data plans who have both exceeded 5GB in a billing cycle and are in an area experiencing network congestion.

Previously, AT&T’s policy said that unlimited LTE users could experience slower data speeds after reaching 5GB, with no mention of location. The change comes after customers complained the carrier’s throttling—some reported speeds as slow as 0.5Mbps—was part of its strategy to sway them away from their unlimited plans.... Read the rest of this post here


"AT&T pulling back on throttling of unlimited LTE customers" is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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AT&T won’t always throttle your unlimited LTE data

An HTC Desire Eye on AT&T

While AT&T has limited its throttling for unlimited 3G data to clogged-up networks, it hasn't been so kind to the LTE crowd. Go past 5GB of usage in a month and your high-speed connection would always slow down, no matter how empty the cell towers might be. The carrier is finally taking a softer stance, however. It recently updated its policy statements to say that it now throttles unlimited LTE data past the 5GB mark only if you're on a congested network. AT&T tells us that it had revealed plans to do this last year -- it just flicked the switch on the policy this week.

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Via: Droid-Life, SlashGear

Source: AT&T

AT&T has quietly changed the way it slows down your ‘unlimited’ LTE data

AT&T Unlimited Data Throttling

Good news for AT&T subscribers who have "unlimited" data plans: It seems that the carrier isn't going to slow down your connection speed unless you're using a congested cell site. Ars Technica flags a recent change in AT&T's network management policy in which the company specifically states that "customers on a 3G or 4G smartphone or on a 4G LTE smartphone with an unlimited data plan who have exceeded 3 gigabytes (3G/4G) or 5 gigabytes (4G LTE) of data in a billing period may experience reduced speeds when using data services at times and in areas that are experiencing network congestion."

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US telecoms try to kill net neutrality by blocking key rules

AT&T signage

The big US telecoms are trying every trick in the book to kill net neutrality, and that includes some very specific tactics. AT&T, CenturyLink and multiple industry groups have sent filings to the FCC asking it to block specific procedures, not the neutrality rules themselves. They want to stop the Commission from both reclassifying the internet as a utility and implementing a standard that prevents providers from "unreasonably interfering" with your internet access. Purportedly, these moves would require "crushing" costs and might chill investments in network upgrades -- arguments we've definitely heard before.

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Via: VentureBeat, HotHardware, SlashGear

Source: Reuters

US telecoms try to kill net neutrality by blocking key rules

AT&T signage

The big US telecoms are trying every trick in the book to kill net neutrality, and that includes some very specific tactics. AT&T, CenturyLink and multiple industry groups have sent filings to the FCC asking it to block specific procedures, not the neutrality rules themselves. They want to stop the Commission from both reclassifying the internet as a utility and implementing a standard that prevents providers from "unreasonably interfering" with your internet access. Purportedly, these moves would require "crushing" costs and might chill investments in network upgrades -- arguments we've definitely heard before.

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Via: VentureBeat, HotHardware, SlashGear

Source: Reuters

AT&T customers can get unwanted charges refunded only until May 1st

AT&T ATandT

If you vaguely recall getting a text from AT&T within the past three months about some sort of a refund for unwanted charges, call this toll-free hotline ASAP: 877-819-9692. A rep can tell you if you're eligible for part of the $80 million AT&T handed over to the FTC when the company settled a complaint accusing it of "mobile cramming." That's what you call the practice of sending and charging subscribers for horoscopes, ring tones, etc. without their consent. The carrier reportedly charged customers "hundreds of millions of dollars" for those spammy third-party subscriptions. Once you know you're eligible, file for a refund quickly (either on the phone or online), because you can only do so until Friday, May 1st.

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Source: USA Today

AT&T promised a customer it could get broadband to his new house – he wound up with 768Kbps service

Why Is AT&T So Bad

Ah, the story of ISPs making promises they can't deliver -- does it ever get old? Ars Technica brings us the sad tale of Dave Mortimer, an AT&T customer in the town of Lowell, Michigan. Before Mortimer moved into his new house in Lowell, he asked whether AT&T would be able to provide it with a broadband connection of at least 20Mbps. AT&T said that it could and, what's more, AT&T's own U-Verse availability check said that it could. After buying and moving into his new house, however, he learned the awful truth.

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AT&T slammed with $25 million fine after employees steal customers’ Social Security numbers

AT&T Customer Data $25 Million Fine

AT&T has made a huge $25 million mistake. The New York Times reports that the Federal Communications Commission slammed AT&T with a massive $25 million fine on Wednesday for "failing to protect the personal information, including the Social Security numbers, of its customers." Essentially, employees at AT&T's call centers in three different countries stole roughly 300,000 customers' names and Social Security numbers and then sold them to third parties. That's obvious a very bad thing.

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FCC fines AT&T $25 million for data breach affecting 280,000 customers

AT&T Cuts 2014 Forecast, Misses Estimates Amid Price Battles

After employees at its call centers swiped personal info of nearly 280,000 customers, AT&T has to pay $25 million to settle with the FCC. The fine is a result of the carrier's "consumer privacy violations" at call centers in Mexico, Colombia and the Philippines, where employees nabbed names, social security numbers and account info without proper authorization. Stolen data was used to request unlock codes, which were then provided to a third party dealing in stolen and "secondary market" handsets. "As today's action demonstrates, the Commission will exercise its full authority against companies that fail to safeguard the personal information of their customers," said FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. In addition to the hefty fine, AT&T must notify all affected customers, in addition to providing credit monitoring services for those included in breaches in both Colombia and the Philippines. It must also appoint a senior compliance manager to keep an eye on things and file regular security reports with the FCC.

[Image credit: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images]

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Source: FCC