Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5 – Review

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

Alcatel have a wide range of devices and keeping up with exactly where each model sits in the range is at times a struggle, when I visited their stand at MWC it took me five minutes to gather myself and work out what was what. Alcatel have sent me on of their more budget models to have a play with. The Onetouch Pop D5, which I’ve been using for the last few weeks. Let’s start the review off with my good and bad points.

Good and Bad Points

Good

  • Nice size.
  • Feels solid.
  • Micro SD card.
  • Removable battery.

Bad

  • Very basic spec.
  • Lots of pre installed apps taking up valuable memory.
  • The app Launcher is confusing.
  • Lack of RAM creates constant screen redraws.
  • Lag in most areas of the UI.
  • Camera performance is shockingly bad.
  • KitKat isn’t funny anymore.
  • Viewing angles on the display aren’t the best.
  • Almost unreadable in daylight outdoors.
  • Android 4.4.2.

Design

Budget phones tend to lack any design, opting for the price to do the talking in the selection process. It’s the same here, there isn’t really anything about the look of it that stands out. Apart from maybe the removable back plate, which is available in a range of colours.

The front of the device you get the display which no doubt will have fingerprints all over it, the capacitive buttons, the sensors, the notification light and the earpiece. The left is bare and the right has the volume rocker, the top has the heapdhone socket and the power button, the bottom has the power socket. The back of the phone has the rear camera, the LED flash and the rear speaker. Nothing really of huge interest.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

Check out my hands on video with the Pop D5 for a round up of the hardware and software.

Hardware

Spec wise the Pop D5 is a bit basic.

  • Processor: MediaTek MT6582 Quad Core 1.30 GHz.
  • GPU: ARM Mali-400 MP.
  • Display: TFT capacitive, 4.5″ 480×854 pixels (218 ppi).
  • Internal Memory: 4 GB (1.58 GB available out of the box).
  • RAM: 512 MB.
  • Rear Camera: 5 MP, 2592 ? 1944 pixels, LED flash, Panorama, HDR, Video 720p at 30fps.
  • Front Camera: VGA.
  • Network: GSM / HSPA.
  • Battery: Li-Ion 1800 mAh.
  • Dimensions: 132.5 x 67.9 x 10 mm.
  • Weight: 150 g.
  • Extras: Micro-SIM, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS with A-GPS, FM Radio.
  • Available Colours: Black/White, Platinum Silver, Ash Gray, Volcano Black, White, Platinum Silver, Cozy Red, Lemon Yellow, Aqua Blue, Jade Green, Lavender.
  • Price: £79 from places like Argos.

I really can’t see much that is worth mentioning, the CPU, the display, the memory and the camera are all lacking. Compared to something like the original Moto E or the Lumia 530 you’d really have to be a hardcore Alcatel fan to buy this.

Here is how the internal storage looked out of the box.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

Software

Alcatel like many other phone manufacturers have their own skin that they apply on top of Android, sometimes it is to mask older versions of Android, sometimes it really adds something of use to the UI and then sometimes it doesn’t really add anything. It’s just a vehicle to pre-install a load of bloat and to create lag for the user.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

The Alcatel launcher is as you’d expect, some skinned icons, some skinned widgets and a whole load of pre-installed junk. No less than 22 extra apps that you’ll probably not use or want.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

Some elements of the launcher are quite cool though and on higher spec hardware would probably give a nice experience, first of which is the drop down toggles, which if there isn’t any notifications automatically opens the toggles.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

The next nice thing is that some apps actually act a bit like widgets when you swipe up on them, I found that messages, phone, music, notes and calendar all have a popup widget that shows you extra info when you swipe up on a homescreen icon.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

Lastly the other nice thing I found was the lockscreen, which you swipe to the right to unlock and to the left to trigger the camera. But you also get lockscreen notifications.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

Other notable stuff

Camera

The 5MP camera on the Pop D5 isn’t great, in low light it struggles a lot, in normal light it gets over exposed and in bright light you can barely see the screen and the lack of tap to focus means it takes a picture of whatever it wants.

The lack of tap to focus basically means that you point the camera at something and it will decide what to focus on. It meant macro photography is a no go and only really landscape photos are do able. Even then the quality isn’t good. When you compare the camera offering here to what Motorola or Nokia are offering at the low end in the control stakes you struggle to comprehend such a basic offering from Alcatel.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

The front facing camera is rated as VGA and it takes some noisy low res selfies.  The front facing camera also seems to add one or two black pixels all the way along the left hand edge, which is weird. As usual apologies for my selfies.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

Battery life

The Pop D5 quite surprised me with it’s battery life. Under heavy use you could easily kill the 1800 mAh battery by lunchtime, but under light use I got two days out of it, admittedly it only had 3 hours of screen on time. But nice to see none the less, it would be handy as standby phone for holidays or something. Just to say about the shots below, the phone was turned off at night, hence it only saying 1d 8h.

Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5   Review

Benchmarks

  • Antutu – 18824
  • Quadrant – 7035
  • 3DMark – Failed to run.

Sound Quality

The Pop D5 has a single rear speaker and a top mounted headphone socket. Call quality was ok and the other caller could hear me clearly. Music quality again was ok, the max volume for music wasn’t great and I had to put the volume on max most of the time and any background noise and your stuffed. The loudspeaker on the back is loud enough to listen to music in a quiet room, the quality wasn’t great and at max volume was a bit distorted.

Conclusion

The Alcatel Pop D5 for the money is a pretty basic phone. The overall experience is as you’d expect on a MediaTek based device for about £80, with lag here and there, some dodgy screen angles and a huge lack of internal memory.

I’d really struggle to recommend this phone to anyone, as I mentioned earlier the low end Lumias or the first gen Moto E or Moto G will offer a much better experience. The lack of memory, lack of storage and the atrocious camera just ruined the whole experience.

The post Alcatel Onetouch Pop D5 – Review is original content from Coolsmartphone.

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  • Twitch’s mobile update makes multitasking easier

    We get it, you're a busy person. Game-broadcasting outfit Twitch understands too, which is why it's brought some new features to its mobile apps. In a move that benefits everyone (assuming that "everyone" means Android and iOS users, exclusively), the application's getting a persistent player window. That means you can fire up a stream, have it play and look for another that might suit your fancy more all at once. Not a fan of what's playing? One swipe and it's gone. Yup, it's a lot like how YouTube's mobile apps work. And speaking of Google, fans of its mobile OS with newer devices have a feature to call their own (for now): audio only mode. This allows you to listen to just the commentary from your favorite broadcasters while the app runs in the background or if your screen is locked, controlling everything via system notifications -- no foolin'.

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    The WhatsApp feature you’ve been dying for is finally here… if you use Android

    WhatsApp Calling Android

    Wireless carriers have one more reason to hate WhatsApp, as Facebook’s popular messaging platform is about to get even better... and more potentially threatening to their bottom lines.

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    iPhone Tricks

    So you think you're a smartphone expert. You know your iPhone or Android phone inside and out and you constantly help your friends and family with their mobile problems. Well, we hate to break it to you, but there are still plenty of things that even the savviest smartphone users out there don't know about.

    For example, did you know that your iPhone or Android phone has tons of secret hidden menus that you can only access by dialing special codes into the phone app?

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    Carphone Warehouse & O2 now stocking the HTC One M9

     

    Carphone Warehouse & O2 now stocking the HTC One M9

    Independent phone retailer Carphone Warehouse, has been taking pre orders for the HTC M9 for some time now, but today the retailer has announced that you’ll be able to get your hands on  the device now. The latest flagship from HTC is listed on contracts that start from £37.50 per month, with no upfront fee.

    Carphone Warehouse has the One M9 in both black and silver. SIM-free will set you back by £579.99. This is several days earlier on the original release date for the device and as of writing we have heard that O2 also have devices ready for purchase, at no upfront cost and £42 per month.

    Carphone Warehouse & O2 now stocking the HTC One M9

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    The post Carphone Warehouse & O2 now stocking the HTC One M9 is original content from Coolsmartphone.

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  • Onkyo’s music player is also DAC and headphone amp for your phone

    The chatter surrounding high fidelity listening devices and services picked up over the last year or so (thanks, Neil Young), and Onkyo hopes its new 3-in-1 device will lure you to the land of high definition. The company's aluminum-wrapped DAC-HA300 is not only a portable music player for audiophiles, but it also serves as both a headphone amp and digital-to-analog converter (DAC) for iOS and Android devices, or even your office workstation. With its primary function, the PMP can wrangle up to 128GB of tunes via a microSD card for 192 kHz/24-bit listening, while also serving as a headphone amp for that set of cans you take along on the daily.

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    Apple just made it easier than ever for you to dump your Android phone

    Apple Android Trade-In Program

    Apple is still on the hunt for Android converts and it's just unveiled a brand-new program that will make it easier than ever for Android users to make the switch. Per MacRumors, Apple has expanded its Reuse and Recycling program to let people trade in their Android phones, BlackBerry phones and Windows Phones in exchange for a credit that's "in the form of an Apple Store gift card or bank transfer."

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    iPhone 6 and Galaxy Note 3

    Yes, the rumors of Apple expanding its trade-in program were true -- the company's stores are now willing to take your competing smartphone in return for credit toward a new iPhone. If you live in France, Italy, the UK or the US, you can trade in certain Android, BlackBerry and Windows Phone devices (the BlackBerry Z10, Lumia 1020 and Nexus 5 are among the examples). We can't imagine that you'll be too eager to use this option -- you may either remain loyal to a platform, or can find a buyer who'll offer more -- but it could be useful if you're determined to ditch an old phone in an eco-friendly way. Just be sure to call if you're going to try this soon. We've reached out to a number of stores, and only a few were aware that non-iPhone trade-ins were live. It could take some time before every store is up to speed.

    Photo by Will Lipman.

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    Source: Apple, Brightstar

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini – Review

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Doro have found themselves a niche, they have really really thought of everything that a phone should do in that particular niche. A few weeks ago I was introduced to the new Liberto 820 Mini and when I got back from MWC there was one waiting for me at home to really get to grips with.

    Good and Bad Points

    Good

    • A great custom UI that is really well thought out.
    • Nice design and great feel in the hand.
    • Doro assistance and management apps.
    • Buttons are all easy to use and locate.
    • Charging Dock included in the box.
    • Dock Mode enables key functions.

    Bad

    • Overall low spec at times leads to delays on loading apps.
    • Front facing camera very low spec.
    • Small Internal Memory could be problematic.
    • A little costly compared to other budget devices on the market.

    Design

    The Liberto 820 Mini has a pretty basic design, although it has a solid construction and it actually looks quite cute.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    The model I was sent was the red model and thanks to that it was quite unique looking, the unique looks continue around the device. The front of the device is dominated by the three hardware buttons beneath the display, for menu, home and back. Long pressing these offer different functions, long pressing back brings up the recents list and long pressing home triggers Google Now. Pressing these buttons does wake the display as well, which saves you having to reach for the power button. The Home button even has two lumps on to help people find the home button if their sight isn’t great or it’s dark.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    The front also is home to the front camera and various sensors. The display feels in all honesty like a very good resistive display, although it isn’t, it’s a 4″ WVGA 5 point multi touch display that attracts fingerprints like a some sort of fingerprint magnet. I ended up clearing the display several times a day.

    The sides of the 820 Mini are home to a variety of buttons (all of which are labelled) and ports. The left hand side has the power button and volume rocker and thanks to the overall small size they are easily reached, although I did often hit the volume down button instead of power.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    The top of the phone has the headphone socket.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

     

    The right hand side has the Micro USB port, which initially seems weird, although it’s placed there to work with the included charging dock.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    The right hand side also has a camera shutter button, which unfortunately doesn’t trigger the camera app when pressed or when pressed and held. It is handy none the less.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    The bottom of the phone doesn’t house anything. The back of the phone is where the camera, the flash, the speaker and the assistance button live.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   ReviewDoro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Under the backplate you get a Micro SIM slot, a Micro SD slot and a replaceable battery. Although tracking down the battery may be fiddly.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    The dock is pretty solid and houses the device in landscape, it is nice that it comes in the box and it won’t fall over.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Overall the design of the 820 Mini is pretty basic, it’s more functional than anything. However it does feel nice in the hand and the back has a kind of soft touch backing. It’s just the fingerprints that detract from the overall design really.

    I’ve also made a brief hands on video too:

    Hardware

    Spec wise it is pretty basic

    • Processor: MediaTek MT6572 1.3 GHz Dual Core ARM Cortex-A7.
    • GPU: Mali-400 MP.
    • Display: 4″ 800×480 WVGA display 233 PPI.
    • Internal Memory: 4 GB with 1.8 GB free out of the box.
    • RAM: 512 MB.
    • Rear Camera: 5 MP with Auto Focus and Flash, 720p Video.
    • Front Camera: VGA photo and 480p Video.
    • HSDPA 21 Mbps, HSUPA 5.76 Mbps.
    • Battery: 1500 mAh Li-Ion 500 hour standby, 18 hour talk time.
    • Android 4.4.2.
    • Bluetooth 4.0, Micro SIM, Micro SD.
    • Hearing Aid Compatibility Rating: T4/M4 (3G), T4/M3 (2G).
    • Dimensions: 126mm x 66mm x 11mm.
    • Weight: 132g.
    • Available colours: steel grey, white and silver, white and black or red.

    Key points in the spec are the small amount of internal memory left out of the box, the lack of RAM, the basic low resolution display and the basic processor. On the plus side however Bluetooth 4.0, Micro SD slot and the speaker are all pretty handy. The overall low spec here isn’t the main event though, Doro have created a software experience for a specific niche market and they have done that through software.

    The display is low resolution at WVGA, which sounds horrific and yes at times certain elements do appear pixelated, but the display doesn’t have any weird viewing angles and it is readable outdoors.

    Out of the box the Internal Memory has about 1.8 GB of the initial 4 GB.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Software

    Software is key, without it your phone won’t do anything. Attention to detail is another key ingredient, without it you’ll end up with a mess, like one of those dodgy foreign phones. Doro make phones and they make software, both make life easier for their users. They have spent years honing and refining their software, creating an environment that at first doesn’t feel like Android and only when you dig down into it you realise that you are holding a real life smartphone.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    The Doro Liberto 820 Mini runs Android 4.4.2 with a custom launcher on top and a whole host of skinned apps included as well. Doro have identified a load of apps and services that their typical users will use and have improved them to be more user friendly. Take for instance the launcher, as show above you get large tiles for each app and only the Google Search Widget and a Weather Widget, that’s it really. You can swipe through screen after screen of apps, you can also make folders and put app tiles within the folder. It is simple and straightforward, designed for the user to get the main thing done, i.e. to open apps fairly quickly.

    Doro have also skinned the settings section, as the settings area on a normal Android device is a little daunting at first, Doro have taken the key things you’ll want to use and put them on nice big tiles, although the icon in the top right opens up the normal settings list.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Doro have also skinned and simplified a lot of the core apps like messaging, phone, calendar, calculator, alarms, camera, gallery, contacts, weather, torch, timer, notes, private notes and dock mode.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Doro in addition to a range of simplified and skinned apps, have also added a few apps that will enable people to be helpers for your phone, which allows them to send you images, contacts and applications. But you also have the assistance button on the back. It is triggered via either a long press for over 3 seconds or a double click within 1 second. Once the assistance button has been triggered it will send an SMS to everyone on the list requesting assistance along with GPS information, it then also dials the contacts too using speaker phone. So if the user takes a fall they can hit the button and call for help over the speaker. It is nice to have on a phone and would give you peace of mind if you were giving this to an elderly person.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    The last thing that is worthy of a mention is the Dock Mode, in the box you get a dock for the phone, it allows you to dock the phone in landscape mode, it charges the phone and triggers a special mode with some key features that would be handy when the phone is docked. It is a really nice feature and will allow you to charge and use the device in a neat way.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Overall I was impressed with the software, Doro have put a lot of thought into the core UI and what it can do. In a power users hands they’ll get frustrated at the lag and the limited number of apps you can install.

    Other Notable Stuff

    Camera

    The rear camera is rated at 5MP and in decent light it just about manages to take a photo, with no real clarity or detail when zoomed in on and it it’s too bright you get over exposure. The front facing camera takes shots at 480×640, which is ok for contact pictures I guess, not much else. Both cameras introduce lots of noise in low light especially the front facing camera.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Here are two selfies I took, sorry….

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Battery Life

    The Doro Liberto 820 Mini has a pretty small battery, at 1500 mAh Li-Ion it didn’t really instill me with confidence, Doro claim 500 hour standby and 18 hour talk time. In reality it all depends on quite what the user wants it to do. When I had it set up just to send and receive SMS, make a few calls, snap a few photos, browse a few websites and watch a few hilarious cat videos on YouTube the battery will last a day or so. If you set it in Android power user mode, with several email accounts syncing, Facebook and Twitter doing their thing, some gameplay at lunchtime in the gents toilet and your Pebble and FitBit syncing all day like there is no tomorrow and you can wave goodbye to that battery by lunchtime.

    Below is what the battery stats showed after two and a half days of light usage. The device was turned off at night and it died at about lunchtime on the third day. For a 1500 mAh battery this is pretty good, it would be handy for an elderly person to not need to be charging it every day.

    Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review Doro Liberto 820 Mini   Review

    Benchmarks

    Benchmarks aren’t everything as we are often told, but they sure do give us a rough idea of how a device performs. Here is how the Liberto 820 Mini performed.

    • Antutu – 11608 (Moto G 2014 – 17585).
    • Quadrant – 4427 (Moto G 2014 – 8806).
    • 3D Mark – Failed to even install the background data required.

    The scores basically show that the dual core MediaTek chip is a bit slow, which you can tell by turning on the phone and browsing through the UI.

    Sound Quality

    The 820 Mini caught me off guard when I heard the sounds coming from it. You get a headphone socket on the top and a single speaker on the back, neither sound amazing, they are just loud, be it the SMS noise or the ringtone or listening to music. Which is ideal for an elderly relative.

    Conclusion

    There are two ways of looking at the 820 Mini, it is either a rather underpowered Android smartphone that doesn’t really have any unique selling points bar the software or you could see it as a really great phone for the elderly, the technologically unsure or for a child. Doro have identified a huge range of use cases and have morphed the Android system to help the user get the job done quickly and easily.

    The few weeks I had the 820 Mini for were great fun, mainly for me the Android power user trying to see just what I could get it to do. Yes at times things were frustrating like with the lag at times, the unresponsiveness shortly after booting and the woeful camera. But for the market that Doro are targetting non of these issues will matter.

    Tesco Mobile have the Doro Liberto 820 Mini available for £99 on Pay as you go, in either grey or white. Or from Doro direct unlocked for about £130 including our friends at Clove, check out the product page here.

    The post Doro Liberto 820 Mini – Review is original content from Coolsmartphone.

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  • KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review.

    KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review.

    Usually, headphones are a difficult item to review and at the end of the day,  you the reader have to take my word for it. We’ve had the KitSound Clash Bluetooth Headphones in for review recently and we’ll start the review off with my good and bad points.

    Good Points

    • Lightweight.
    • They fold up for ease of storage with carry case.
    • No syncing sound issues.
    • Easy to use controls.
    • Despite being on ear they comfortable to wear.

    Bad Points

    • Blue flashing LED bright at night.

    Design

    The Kitsound Clash Bluetooth Headphones have a brushed aluminium construction, which are available in a number of different colours. The headphones are fully adjustable and fold up so that they fit nicely inside the supplied rugged carrying case.

    KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review.

    On the right hand side headphone are all the usual controls: On/Off, Play/Pause, Answer/Hangup calls, Volume Up/Down, Rewind/Fast Forward. On the bottom is the MicroUSB charging port, a 3.5mm audio port and an LED. The left headphone is completely blank.

    KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review.

    Once charged, which took about 2 hours from out of the box, (but I’m unsure how much charge they had at unboxing) they were ready for use.

    In Use.

    As with any other Bluetooth device they paired with my devices easily, and for this review I paired them with my phone which is currently the LG G3, and my iPad mini.

    My normal headphone of choice is a Bose Triport fully over-the-ear headphones. These headphones are somewhat old now, but they are amazingly comfortable to wear for a long time and the sound quality is second to none as you would come to expect from Bose.

    I normally don’t like to use “on-ear” headphones as I find that after a relatively short amount of time they start to hurt my ears (feel free to insert the freaky shaped ear comments). I wore the KitSound Clash headphones for a couple of hours on the train whilst en route to March Of The Droids 2015 and much like Bose, they didn’t cause any discomfort.

    In the sound the quality department, I cannot knock the KitSound Clash headphones; the sound was clear with good bass and midrange. They went plenty loud enough to damage your hearing without becoming distorted.

    One thing I have noticed using some other Bluetooth headphones is sometimes when watching media is that you get a sync issue between the picture and the sound, the sound being half a second behind the pictures (any of the older readers remember the TV series Monkey? If not check out YouTube).  No matter how I try, I can’t watch media with this syncing issue. I tried this with the KitSound Clash headphones, and everything was perfectly in sync, so another plus there.

    KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review.

    Conclusion

    The KitSound Clash Bluetooth headphones are available from Amazon for £75. Would I use them over my tried and trusted Bose headphones? In both comfort and sound quality, they come a very close second – very close indeed, but Clash headphones have the advantage of giving the user of being wireless.

    The post KitSound Clash, Bluetooth Headphones Review. is original content from Coolsmartphone.

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